Rules for dating in the military

The academy fields fifteen men's and nine women's National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) sports teams.

Cadets compete in one sport every fall, winter, and spring season at the intramural, club, or intercollegiate level.

The class of 1943 graduated six months early in January 1943, and the next four classes graduated after only three years.

The academy had its last serious brush with abolition or major reform during the war, when some members of Congress charged that even the accelerated curriculum allowed young men to "hide out" at West Point and avoid combat duty.

Tuition for cadets is fully funded by the Army in exchange for an active duty service obligation upon graduation.

Approximately 1,300 cadets enter the Academy each July, with about 1,000 cadets graduating.

Besides the integration of southern-state and black cadets, the post-war academy also struggled with the issue of hazing.

In its first 65 years, hazing was uncommon or non-existent beyond small pranks played upon the incoming freshmen, but took a harsher tone as Civil War veterans began to fill the incoming freshman classes.

It was the first American college to have an accredited civil-engineering program and the first to have class rings, and its technical curriculum was a model for later engineering schools.

In all, wartime contingencies and post-war adjustments resulted in ten classes, varying in length of study from two to four years, within a seven-year period before the regular course of study was fully resumed.

Mac Arthur was a firm supporter of athletics at the academy, as he famously said "Upon the fields of friendly strife are sown the seeds that, upon other fields, on other days, will bear the fruits of victory." As World War II engulfed Europe, Congress authorized an increase to 2,496 cadets in 1942 and began graduating classes early.

Its football team was a national power in the early and mid-20th century, winning three national championships.

Its alumni and students are collectively referred to as "The Long Gray Line" and its ranks include two Presidents of the United States (as well as the President of the Confederate States of America), presidents of Costa Rica, Nicaragua, and the Philippines, numerous famous generals, and seventy-six Medal of Honor recipients.